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Total results: 798.

Compiled by HRIC based on published reports and information available online. Total Count: 136 individuals. (An asterisk (*) denotes that the detention or physical restriction of the individual has ended.) 

Last updated August 2014. 

See also: Citizen Activists on Trial 2013-2014: Schedule/Status and Essays

2014

Updated: May 8, 2015

Starting in late 2013, a number of citizen activists, many of whom were involved in the New Citizens Movement and actively campaigning for official asset transparency, were put on trial in Beijing and Guangdong. The numerous detentions and trials of citizen activists demonstrate a trend of intensifying crackdown on citizen activism, particularly in relation to official asset transparency and corruption. Below is a regularly updated HRIC compilation of trial schedules and statuses, as well as related statements and essays. 

August 12, 2016

In the first week of August 2016, the Tianjin No. 2 Intermediate People's Court tried and convicted one rights lawyer and three activists of “subversion of state power.” They were Zhai Yanmin (翟岩民), a law firm employee; Hu Shigen (胡石根), a democracy and religious freedom activist; Zhou Shifeng (周世鋒), a lawyer and law firm director; and Gou Hongguo (勾洪国), a rights activist. 

October 2015

[English translation by Human Rights in China]

LOI
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Chinese original

English translation

  • Full text of Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment: ENCH

China ratified* the CAT in 1988.

China has enjoyed marked progress in its legal system since beginning economic reforms and opening up in the late-1970s. Training of judges, prosecutors, police, and defense lawyers has also contributed to gradual improvement of the civil and criminal justice systems. Despite these advances, legal reform continues to face serious challenges.

China underwent its third Universal Periodic Review (UPR) at the United Nations in Geneva on Tuesday, November 6, 2018. The review took place in the context of a mounting volume of reports since 2017 on the massive internment of ethnic Uyghur Muslims in Xinjiang—estimated at 1 million, out of the area’s total Uyghur population of 11 million—into what the authorities call “re-education” camps.

China’s more than 250,000 lawyers do not yet benefit from many of the fundamental protections outlined in the UN Basic Principles for Lawyers. Moreover, the growing body of rights defense lawyers and their increasingly sophisticated and diverse legal activism has triggered heightened interference from authorities, both legal and extralegal.

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